THE 'SWISS ARMY KNIFE OF PREHISTORIC TOOLS' FOUND IN ASIA, SUGGESTS HOMEGROWN TECHNOLOGY

A study by an international team of researchers have determines that carved stone tools, also known as Levallois cores, were used in Asia 80,000 to 170,000 years ago. With the find -- and absent human fossils linking the tools to migrating populations -- researchers believe people in Asia developed the technology independently, evidence of similar sets of skills evolving throughout different parts of the ancient world.

ScienceDaily.com (Date:11/19/2018 21:33) Read full article >>

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