READERS SOUND OFF ON ANIMAL RIGHTS, 'RACISM' AND FEUDING FARROWS

Value animal lives as much as our own Rockville, Md.: The Daily News became a leader in journalism by publishing an article on the next civil rights movement — animal rights. "Our obscene hypocrisy on animal rights" by Kenny Torrella (Op-Ed, Sept. 17) highlights that the root of all injustices...

NY Daily News (Date:09/20/2018 07:06) Read full article >>

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