NEW GENERATION OF THERAPEUTICS BASED ON UNDERSTANDING OF AGING BIOLOGY SHOW PROMISE FOR ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

A scientific strategy that explores therapeutic targets based on the biology of aging is gaining ground as an effective approach to prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease.

ScienceDaily.com (Date:12/07/2018 23:57) Read full article >>

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Alzheimer: Alzheimer's disease , also known in medical literature as Alzheimer disease, is the most common form of dementia. There is no cure for the disease, which worsens as it progresses, and eventually leads to death. It was first described by German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer in 190