NEW GENDER LAW COULD LET MY GIRLS INHERIT TITLE, SAYS EARL

Tthe Earl of Balfour has suggested that one of his four daughters might declare that she identifies herself as a man so she could become the next Earl, writes SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE.

dailymail.co.uk (Date:11/30/2017 02:12) Read full article >>

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Earl: An earl is a member of the nobility. The title is Anglo-Saxon, akin to the Scandinavian form jarl, and meant "chieftain", particularly a chieftain set to rule a territory in a king's stead. In Scandinavia, it became obsolete in the Middle Ages and was replaced with duke . In later medieval Britain,