LOSING A SPOUSE COULD SPEED BRAIN'S DECLINE

In fact, people who are widowed and have high levels of beta-amyloid plaque, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, appear to experience cognitive decline three times faster than similar people who have not lost a spouse, the researchers added.

Webmd.com (Date:02/26/2020 20:50) Read full article >>

Related News about "Losing a Spouse Could Speed Brain's Decline" news from other sites: (news similarity rate is shown on left.)

30%
Stunning Video Shows Air Traffic Decline Due To Coronavirus Check out this video showing the air traffic decline amid the coronavirus... Geo Beats >>
22%
The Key To Building Strength, Overcoming Adversity: 'Don't Be Your Own Speed Bump' "The hardest thing I had to deal with is people doubting me, and how I got over it was always proving people wrong." Father, husband, designer, mentorĀ and speaker Ryan Hudson-Peralta spoke with Benz.. benzinga.com >>
22%
France turned one of its high-speed trains into an ambulance to transport coronavirus patients across the country FREDERICK FLORIN/AFP via Getty Images France turned one of its high-speed trains into a vehicle to transport coronavirus patients from overburdened hospitals in the east to the facilities with more.. BusinessInsider >>
23%
'The Decline': Film Review Escaping human society is one thing, human nature quite another in "The Decline." The Canadian thriller, available exclusively through Netflix, offers a modicum of timeliness for U.S. viewers who've c.. Variety.com >>
19%
Stock Round Up | 49 stocks advance, 25 decline and 6 trade firm The Jamaica Stock Exchange (JSE) Combined Index ended the week up on Friday with an advance/decline ratio of 49/25 The index advanced 9,372.72 points or 2.72 per cent to close at 354,007.88. The JSE M.. jamaica-gleaner.com >>
Alzheimer: Alzheimer's disease , also known in medical literature as Alzheimer disease, is the most common form of dementia. There is no cure for the disease, which worsens as it progresses, and eventually leads to death. It was first described by German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer in 190