GENETIC BRAIN DISORDER FIXED IN MICE USING PRECISION EPIGENOME EDITING

Using a targeted gene epigenome editing approach in the developing mouse brain, researchers reversed one gene mutation that leads to the genetic disorder WAGR syndrome, which causes intellectual disability and obesity in people. This specific editing was unique in that it changed the epigenome -- how the genes are regulated -- without changing the actual genetic code of the gene being regulated.

ScienceDaily.com (Date:12/10/2019 23:23) Read full article >>

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