WHY GILES DEACON IS THE PERFECT DESIGNER FOR PIPPA MIDDLETON'S WEDDING DRESS

I don’t like to say I told you so, BUT I did predict that the Duchess of Cambridge's little sister would opt to wear the British designer on her big day

mirror.co.uk (Date:05/20/2017 15:07) Read full article >>

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British: The word British is an adjective referring in various ways to the United Kingdom, or the island of Great Britain, and its people.
Duchess: A duke or duchess can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of the nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank